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Urban Echo - Connected Public Spaces

This is a really interesting idea to project one city space into another city space through a physical object that looks like a sign post. An interesting interaction of the physical and the virtual in a public place.


View on Vimeo



Urban Echo from LUSTlab on Vimeo.


Information from Vimeo Page

"Now that we are familiar with being connected digitally, the physicality of our interactions becomes important again. The globalised communication systems we use everyday exist on a level above our tangible surroundings.

Urban Echo brings some of this communication back to real locations, connecting public places and therefore people, cities and cultures. It extends space beyond our once concrete parameters.

Webcams allow you to see into another space, mirrors allow you to see your own space. Using billboard screens and cameras, Urban Echo creates a hybrid of these two things, allowing not only see into another city but maybe see yourself transported into another city or culture. A mid point between transparency and reflection, introspection and extrospection.

 Placed in public areas, the screens have a variety of modes. Sometimes they create a recursive loop allowing interaction between people in multiple cities and sometimes they are just a window to another place, that might intrigue a passer by. They can connect regardless of distance, folding locations together and rearranging our perspective of public space."

Source: http://vimeo.com/23579142

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